If you are looking for a job, your social media posts could be the deciding factor for many recruiters.

Last year, CareerBuilder found 70 percent of employers used social media to research job candidates. Out of those more than half found content that caused them not to hire someone.

"Some of the things we see that costs people jobs is they use a lot of profanity, they do character assassinations, off-color posts," Gary Ball, co-owner of Express Employment Professionals, said.

His company looks at multiple platforms in the hiring process, he said.

"For our prospective clients, typically they'll look at Facebook, they'll look at Twitter, they'll look at Instagram, and it would be surprising to most people how much information is out there," Ball said.

Job seekers said it is something they are always thinking about.

"My social media is extremely private, it doesn't even have a picture of me," Quinton Melnick, a Texas Tech student, said. "You know, I don't want anything on there that could get me in trouble."

Phoebe Knight, a junior at Texas Tech, said although it is a concern, she believes judging candidates by their online profiles is fair.

"We represent the companies in everyday life, and I think if there's something out there that can hinder the way people look at a company, it should definitely be taken into consideration when applying for a job," Knight said.

it is not all bad though. Job seekers could also use social media to showcase skills, experience and community involvement.

"Building not only your own content, but have other people endorse you and what you're doing, feel free to comment and like other people's posts and just be active in conversations and engaging," Steven Lanz, an associate with 49 Financial, said.

The bottom line, they said, is stay away from the negativity. Lanz said once you post something, it is there forever, and it could make the difference in whether you get hired.