The new age of dating: Swipe to find love

The new age of dating: Swipe to find love

LUBBOCK, Texas -

Tinder or Bumble may be downloaded on your phone, already. If it's not, app users swipe to find love. Right if you like a picture, left if you don't.

It may seem like the wrong way to find a life-long partner, but swiping right works for many couples. Those are the one's who say, "Don't knock it til you try it."

Gretchen Hoffman had a wine night with some girlfriends when they decided to download Bumble, "And I don't remember, but I was swiping right on everyone. All of the people. And I said the same thing to everyone, I said 'Hey, whatever their name was, what's up or something?'" the music teacher remembered.

Jake Hoffman had been on the app for a while, "Me and my best friend were, drunk, and I saw swiping right on every one as well," he said.

The morning after their fun-filled nights, they woke up to see what they'd gotten in to, and check up on their matches.

"Some of them were questionable, then I saw Jake's and I thought, oh, this one's cute," Gretchen said.

They exchanged messages. That led to a phone call.

"She was talking to me about how I'd be too drunk to remember in the morning, and so I said, test me, and she goes, alright, I'll give you three words to remember, the words were motorcycle, saxophone and chicken," Jake remembered them, because he wrote them down.

The two had their first date the next night.

"I kind of went oh crap, I actually have to meet one of them in person. That kind of wasn't the plan," Gretchen laughed.

Jake picked her up, with flowers. He also fixed her door. Then they went to Buffalo Wild Wings. Both remembered the conversation flowing naturally.

"She called her mom and told her, mom I'm going to marry this man," Jake said. According to Gretchen, "Her response was, he could be a serial killer!"

Gretchen's mom had a point. How do you really know who is behind the screen. According to Gregory Derderian, a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, the apps are good to use as an icebreaker, but be cautious.

"Knowing what you're using it for and being clear on what the other person is using it for can be easy to eliminate or select potential people to try and go on a date with," Derderian said.

For this couple, the app was the icebreaker.

"You may be able to get into a little bit of what you like, the passions and the things like that. But I think the real intimacy and commitment starts to be built in the actual face-to-face," Derderian added.

Gretchen and Jake knew there was something at Buffalo Wild Wings.

"We came home and I don't think we've spent a night apart, the rest of forever," Gretchen said.

When it was time to meet the families, Gretchen told hers the truth, while they made up a story for Jake's family.

"We had met at a bar, given her my jacket and she gave me her number and that's how we met," Jake originally shared.

His family thought that for about a year, until Jake let it slip one night at the dinner table.

"It's probably good that it happened because my sister was the first one to be like, wait, y'all met on an app?" Jake laughed.

The two dated for a year and a half before Jake proposed. They're now celebrating life as newlyweds.

"The typical, I love him more every day actually is a real thing," Gretchen said.

The Hoffmans plan to travel over the next year. They hope to have a family one day, but for now it's them with their two dogs.

Just remember, this relationship started over alcohol and an app.

"It's one of those things, don't knock it til you try it. cause I knocked it all the time, I was like oh gosh you're on tinder, whisper it, you're on bumble, and then I was just like I'm gonna do this to support other people, but then it ended up working out for me," Gretchen smiled, and added, "Download, swipe right."

Bumble reported thousands of marriages started with the app. More than 58 million users swipe, with a bout 19 million matches per week.

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