UPDATED: Fired ME's office employee files suit against Andrews,

UPDATED: Fired ME's office employee files suit against Andrews, Matshes, NAAG

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Dr. Sam Andrews, Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Sam Andrews, Chief Medical Examiner

A Lubbock County employee who was terminated from the Medical Examiner's Office has filed a lawsuit against NAAG Pathology Labs, Dr. Evan Matshes and Dr. Sam Andrews. Andrews is the Lubbock County Medical Examiner. NAAG is the company contracted by the county to operate the ME's office.

Attorney Kevin Glasheen has scheduled a 2 p.m. news conference to discuss the lawsuit filed by Senee Graves. We will have the news conference live here and on our Facebook page this afternoon.

In a news release, Glasheen wrote, “Ms. Graves is a hero for exposing these California body snatchers who have taken over the Lubbock County Medical Examiner’s Office. Of course, they immediately fired her for doing so – and now we are going to make them pay.”

The lawsuit, which contains graphic details, can be viewed here.

The media release also states, "Senee Graves was fired after she observed and reported potentially illegal and suspicious activity within the Medical Examiner’s Office – including autopsies performed by an unlicensed physician, and concerns over shipping excessive numbers of body parts to NAAG’s lab in California for research purposes. Even though Ms. Graves was employed by Lubbock County, the County allowed the contracted doctors to terminate her employment. In her lawsuit, Ms. Graves seeks monetary damages that would make her whole, and damages to punish NAAG, Dr. Matshes, and Dr. Andrews for their actions."

Graves makes claims in the lawsuit that are similar to those made by County Commissioner Jason Corley. We reported on his allegations yesterday, including photos that appear to back up his claims. The suit states on Jan. 4 Graves reported her concerns to Corley and signed an affidavit of her claims of "excessive tissue harvest and the unlicensed practice of medicine by Dr. Matshes".

Graves claims in August 2018, "Dr. Matshes stated that he wanted to collect more tissue from those autopsies than had been done in the past, because he needed that tissue for his 'research.'"

The suit continues: "Dr. Matshes gathered the staff to watch as he performed two autopsies on infants. The new protocol required the removal of the children’s brain, eyes, spinal cord, posterior neck, including vertebra, and the heart and lungs, which Dr. Matshes demonstrated on both children. Dr. Matshes stated that he was acting as a “tech”, not a doctor, since was not licensed to practice medicine in Texas. Dr. Matshes made the incisions and removed the organs himself, while Dr. Andrews observed along with the staff."

According to Graves' lawsuit, in September 2018 "[she] saw Dr. Matshes in an autopsy room where an autopsy was being conducted on an infant who had died from meningitis. As soon as the child’s skull cap was removed, everyone agreed that the cause of death was an obvious case of meningitis. Dr. Matshes then stated that he “needed more naturals like this for research” and directed the staff to take all the tissue outlined in the new protocol. The staff eventually understood that Dr. Matshes was doing research to identify certain markers for child abuse but needed more studies of tissue from infant and children who had died natural deaths, to compare to the tissue from children who had died from abuse, and that was the purpose of the tissue harvest."

The suit states other employees in the Medical Examiner's office quit over the next few months, "many of them because they were upset by what appeared to be unnecessary and inappropriate harvesting of tissue from infants and children, and the unnecessary harvesting of those bodies."

We are working to gather more information on this developing story. If we get a response from Andrews, Matshes or NAAG we will post it in this story. We attempted to speak with Dr. Andrews Tuesday by phone and in-person, but were unsuccessful.

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