5 things to know: Wednesday

5 things to know: Wednesday

Posted: Updated:

UPDATED: Reagor-Dykes Auto Group requests court to allow sale of company

LUBBOCK, Texas - The Chief Restructuring Officer for Reagor-Dykes filed documents in bankruptcy court asking for approval to start bidding procedures for remaining assets. This would allow KamKad Automotive Holdings as a "Stalking Horse bidder" and allow a competitive bidding process to begin.

According to court documents, "The procedures intended to enhance competitive bidding" and "ensure the sales price for the assets is the highest value possible." 

By September 21, the documents show if the court approves KamKad, it will place into escrow a deposit of $1,000,000.  In a Non-Binding Letter of Intent between Kamkad and Reagor-Dykes, it states the purchase price is $25,321,520, plus assumed liabilities, and existing inventory payoff amount determined by Ford Motor Credit. 

Reagor-Dykes Auto Group asks the court to approve proposed sale transaction and bid procedures. A sale hearing would be on November 28, if approved.


Lubbock ISD implements "restorative circles" to improve students' mental health

LUBBOCK, Texas - It is National Suicide Prevention Week, and school districts like Lubbock ISD are constantly searching for ways to combat mental illness with students. Chris Huber, principal of Atkins Middle School, said the school is implementing restorative circles each day, small groups allowing students to open up and share with an adult.

“Kids need to have an adult that they connect with every day at school, at least one,” Huber said. “Somebody who they can turn to, somebody who is looking out for them. So that’s one of the reasons we do advisory every day. So that kids are in a small group with a teacher and it’s about 30 minutes."

Huber added parents need to be aware of mixed signals from their children, as he said it is sometimes difficult to really know what their child is going through.


Lubbock honors the fallen of 9/11 attack

LUBBOCK, Texas - A total of 2,977 people were killed in New York City, Washington, DC and outside of Shanksville, Pennsylvania, 17 years ago. 343 were New York City firefighters, 23 were NYPD officers, and 37 were officers at the Port  Authority. Lubbock honored the fallen, the families who still cope with the loss, and veterans who've died in the global war on terror on Tuesday afternoon outside the county courthouse.

"The soldiers and the first responders and the victims of 9-11 gave their lives for the right reason," said Ysidro Gutierrez, with the American Legion Post 500.  "And that is in defense of the values and traditions that we hold dear here in America."

Among the soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines that have died since the beginning of the global war on terror. The American Legion Post and the Veteran's of Foreign Wars paid tribute to 23 year old corporal Jose Velez from Lubbock, who died in Fallujah in 2004 clearing an enemy stronghold. He was posthumously awarded two purple hearts, the bronze star, and a silver star.


Report claims Texas Tech System loses $10 million pledge following Duncan's retirement

LUBBOCK, Texas - The Texas Tech System has reportedly lost a $10 million pledge from a former mayor of Amarillo. Jay Leeson, with "The Other Side of Texas" reported Jerry Hodge has withdrawn his donation because of Chancellor Robert Duncan's forced resignation. Hodge's donation reportedly included $3 million for the pharmacy school, including naming rights, and $7 million for the proposed vet school. The vet school is often cited as reason for the Board of Regents forcing Duncan to resign. 

Hodge wrote, in an email to the Tech System, "it is not the institutions, it is the people running both Texas Tech and A&M leadership, that is the reason we are upset." The e-mail indicates Hodge plans on writing an open letter to the governor, with no punches pulled.

In response, Interim Chancellor Tedd Mitchell said Hodge was instrumental in establishing the school of pharmacy, including gathering funding and support for it. He said he is forever grateful and is committed to working with Hodge on both the school of pharmacy, and the School of Veterinary Medicine.


"Monster" Hurricane Florence nears Carolina coast

WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) - Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days.

While some said they planned to stay put despite hurricane watches and warnings that include the homes of more than 5.4 million people on the East Coast, many weren't taking any chances.

A steady stream of vehicles full of people and belongings flowed inland Tuesday, and North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper tried to convince everyone to flee.

Forecasters said Florence was expected to blow ashore late Thursday or early Friday, then slow down and dump 1 to 2½ feet (0.3 to 0.6 meters) of rain that could cause flooding well inland and wreak environmental havoc by washing over industrial waste sites and hog farms.

Powered by Frankly