Lubbock County adopts lower tax rate and budget for new fiscal y

Lubbock County adopts lower tax rate and budget for new fiscal year

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LUBBOCK, Texas -

Lubbock County adopted to lower the tax rate from 35 to 34 cents, as well as the incoming budget, Monday morning. 

Precinct One Commissioner Bill McCay said the new tax rate will be effective on October 1st, the start of the fiscal year. 

He added this is a win-win scenario as they set the budget. 

“We feel strongly about trying to keep as much money in our taxpayer’s pockets as we can and so that’s why we adopted the effective tax rate and we can continue to pretty much maintain the same budgets we’ve had in the past,” McCay said.

McCay said the county’s growth and development is a key factor in their confidence to lower the tax rate.

“We have confidence in this community. It’s a growing community. You can’t help but notice all of the growth with both residential and commercial, so we have confidence in the growth of this community that these additional growth dollars will help fund this upcoming fiscal year and so we adopted the effective tax rate. It is a lowering of our tax by one penny,” McCay said.

McCay said ensuring public safety is reflected in the upcoming budget... adding the county is working harder than ever before to keep people safe. 

“We’re confident that the community is not going to see any less public safety than they can see currently. What we have funded in terms of the war on drugs, gang violence, we worked with the Sheriff’s department on that, partnering with the city of Lubbock, DPS, and so we’re all in as far as public safety and ensuring our community is safe, not just for law enforcement, but in county roads as well,” McCay said.

Mikel Ward, Lubbock taxpayer advocate, said she was originally worried the county would neglect the needs of departments that help protect its citizens. 

“Since we were pretty tight on the budget, particularly in the Sheriff’s department and so forth, I talked to Kelly Rowe and he said he got most of it restored, not what they wanted particularly, but something they can live with. We’ve got to prioritize and use our money wisely,” Ward said.

Ward said the new tax rate helped ease those concerns. 

“But I think I we’re growing pretty fast so anything that keeps up with our growth, particularly in law enforcement, I think would be good use of it,” Ward said.

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