Silent Wings Museum commemorates Veterans

Silent Wings Museum commemorates Veterans

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LUBBOCK, Texas -

The nation paused to honor and celebrate those who have served our nation on Veterans Day. The Silent Wings Museum held a ceremony and opened their exhibits for free.

Juno Bishop, a volunteer and board member for the museum said she volunteers in tribute to her father, a former World War II fighter pilot.

"There's a red, white, and blue strain that goes between all of us out here," Bishop said.

Bishop was presented with a commemorative American flag, in honor of the National World War II Fighter Pilot Association. She said it was a special moment representing her dad's sacrifice.

"My dad's smiling." Bishop said. "Many, many hundreds of thousands of veterans are smiling, even though they are not with us here, I know they are with us."

District 5 councilwoman, Karen Gibson said she worries the holiday is losing its significance.  She said it is crucial to remember those lives put on the line and the families affected.

"As these children grow up, I think that's being lost, in the shuffle of life." Gibson said. "So I think it's very important that these kids come and learn what veterans day is really all about."

Lubbock Congressmen, Jodey Arrington said the museum is an asses to the city.

"It's a place you can bring your family, you can bring your children and tell the story freedom isn't free, and people have had to step up and be willing to pay the ultimate sacrifice." Arrington said.

He hoped families witnessing the ceremony and visiting the museum leave impacted.

"It's one thing to tell your children that and your family that, it's another thing to bring them here so they can see the artifacts from the various wars, and listen to the history, and meet people who are veterans," Arrington said.

Along with their annual Veterans Day ceremony, the museum has World War II exhibits year round.

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