Snyder preservationist films demolition of 106-year-old Santa Fe

Snyder preservationist films demolition of 106-year-old Santa Fe depot

(Press Release):

SNYDER, TEXAS — After years of struggle they couldn’t find a way to save their Santa Fe Railway Depot, the last of its kind intact in the world. Preservation Texas named it to the Texas Most Endangered Places list in 2011. The community sought willing purchasers — and eventually found one. But in the end they couldn’t afford to move it.

Still, preservationists in Snyder, Texas, managed to save everything they could of the Santa Fe Railway Depot — from paver bricks to stucco accents and artifacts, to blueprints of the building designed by artchitect Louis S. Curtiss for the Santa Fe Railroad in 1911. (Its “sister structure” has been repurposed and somewhat modified in Post, Texas, as that city’s Chamber of Commerce.)

Last week, they brought in experts from Texas Tech University to conduct a laser scan — with a technique used on buildings from the Statue of Liberty to Quanah Parker’s Star House — that will yield a digital record and a virtual tour, to be preserved in the Library of Congress.

And this morning, Fri., Nov. 10, when demolition began before 8:00 a.m., they took to Facebook Live to record and comment on the entire process.

Narration and videography on behalf of the Scurry County Historical Commission by Paula Hatfield, a former president of the Texas Plains Trail Region, along with memories shared by with local residents and a former Santa Fe employee, have been captured on more than 3 hours of Facebook video. Their efforts should serve to educate the public, as well as to honor this historic building in its last hours — even as modern-day BNSF freight trains rush by.

View several segments here:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/ScurryCountyHistoricalCommission/videos/?ref=page_internal

Scurry County Historical Commission

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Scurry County Historical Commission, Snyder, Texas. 443 likes · 766 talking about this · 1 was here. The Scurry County division of the Texas Historic Commission is busy preserving our current...

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