'Texas Two Step' offers quick CPR training

'Texas Two Step' offers quick CPR training

Heart disease is the number one killer of Texans, with four out of five cardiac arrests occurring at home. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) saves lives, but most people are unprepared to help when a loved one, friend or colleague needs CPR. The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Medicine's Emergency Medicine Club will partner with the Texas College of Emergency Physicians (TCEP), the Texas Medical Association and the American College of Emergency Physicians to host "Texas Two Step: How to Save a Life" on February 11.

The Texas Two Step, a 10-minute training session in hands-only CPR, will teach participants how to act quickly to save a life by taking two steps that include calling 9-1-1 and beginning hands-only CPR. CPR is a lifesaving technique that aims to keep blood and oxygen flowing through the body when a person's heartbeat and breathing have stopped.

Texas Two Step CPR Training will provide life-saving training for all Texans, while offering medical students an opportunity to work with their communities. Representatives from all nine Texas medical schools will participate. Last year, more than 4,250 individuals trained to provide life-saving hands-only CPR at 53 sites in 10 cities across Texas.

The event will take place at five locations including:

Market Street, 98th and Quaker, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Market Street, 19th and Quaker, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Texas Tech University (TTU) library, 3001 18th St., 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.

TTU Robert H. Ewalt Student Recreation Center, 3219 Main St., 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church, 2316 Broadway St., 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

The free event is open to the public. Participants will practice on mannequins and will be provided with educational materials summarizing the skills learned. For more information about Texas Two Step, email cody.g.clapp@ttuhsc.edu or visit texacep.org. 

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